59716 Volunteer

Photo courtesy of Sarah Blechta

Boardrooms of progress

A recent study by the Alliance for Board Diversity found that women and minorities are slowly making traction in boardrooms. After serving on the Morning Star board for 4 years, Sarah Blechta’s friend mentioned that she would be a good fit for Resort Tax. She had not thought of joining it before that conversation – but ran and won. 

A beautiful day for removing fences with the Boy Scouts.

Service oriented: Nicole Miller has spent a lifetime helping others

Nicole Miller stays busy – and not just because she has three kids and works for Big Sky School District. 

She spent Monday night decorating the hallways of Lone Peak High School with other moms for Homecoming week, is a regular at the scorekeeping table for volleyball games and is on the list to help with football games. 

Lee Griffiths skied almost every ski area out west before settling on Big Sky as his home. Like many residents, he is determined to do his part to improve the Big Sky community and the world.

Bettering Big Sky

There is nothing Lee Griffiths does that is not well thought-out. His move to Big Sky years ago was quite researched and intentional. He knew he wanted to escape the rat race of the East Coast and settle in a ski community out west, so he spent an entire season visiting many resort areas.

Sarah “Sippi” Sipe poses for a photo with Gladys Thomas, mother of Lance and Terry Thomas. Gladys celebrated her 93rd birthday in July and has lived in Big Sky with her sons and her daughter-in-law, Mary Goodson, for more than 20 years. Gladys is currently at the Madison Valley Manor recovering from a broken arm as a result of a fall. “She's my favorite person in Big Sky, she's a total rock star, and I love her dearly!!” Sipe wrote to the Lookout in a request to use this image. PHOTO COURTESY SARAH SIPE

Sara "Sippi" Sipe

I asked Sarah “Sippi” Sipe to sit down with me, delay the comfort of her home and cuddles with her cat –Tom Newberry – and to share stories of her abundant volunteer work. We spoke at end of day in the conference room of her accounting office when most people were gone – the faintest tapping of keys on one lonely computer could be heard.

Gaither hopes items past their prime will go to good use somewhere—fruits and veggies could be composted, and according to online sources, milk that is sour but not curdled can be used for making cheese, baking and even facial masks.

Compost anyone?

It kills Big Sky Community Food Bank Operations Manager Sarah Gaither to throw away food. After all, the items she receives are donated with the hope each will go to good use for hungry Big Sky residents.

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