Doctors and nurses are able to protect themselves from “COVID coughs to the face” with the help of donated ski goggles. PHOTO COURTESY GOGGLES FOR DOCS

A PERFECT SKI TOWN OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

GOGGLES FOR DOCS IS HELPING FRONTLINE WORKERS STAY SAFE DESPITE THE SHORTAGE OF PPE

Just as poo hits the fan with COVID-19, Skiers and snowboarders across the country have a unique opportunity to assist a nationwide effort – donating ski goggles for medical personnel who have no personal protective equipment (PPE) for eye protection. Goggles for Docs is a new nonprofit organization. It first got legs via a request for ski goggles by an emergency room (ER) physician who is the department head for a hospital in New York City that landed with a ski race coach at Catamount Ski Area. From that initial request, the effort has gained major traction with 35,964 goggles donated thus far and a current need for 4,900 more.

“We provide ski and skate goggles for doctors and nurses on the frontlines of fighting COVID-19 as there is not enough Personal Protective Equipment to keep them safe,” Anna Atwell, Regional Coordinator for Montana Goggles for Docs said. She said the organization is in need of more drop off locations, volunteers and goggles.

Hospitals are able to request goggles by adding themselves to a master list and those with goggles can currently choose to ship them to any one of dozens of hospitals and clinics in need. Should the lenses be tinted or clear? “Either. They have nothing. Dark lenses are better than a COVID cough to the face,” the googlesfordocs.com website said.

For those healthcare workers who normally wear glasses, Sport RX is donating prescription inserts for the donated goggles.

Further information is available at gogglesfordocs.com, including a video tutorial that walks people through how to correctly clean the goggles before donating them.

Right now, the Hungry Moose is the only drop-off location in Big Sky, the other option is to ship the goggles, which expedites the process of getting them to frontline workers.

“In the midst of a very real crisis, I have been amazed by the ability of Montanans to support those in need. Individual businesses and families have made incredible efforts to support this cause,” Atwell said. “People who live in Montana as always, have proven to be resilient, caring and passionate about making our world a better place.”

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