Art

All but the glue and the nails have been harvested from nature for Brett Ozment’s creations.

Art on the fly

It is clear that to Brett Ozment art is freedom and freedom is art. He left the familiarity of his Missouri home with long nights spent fishing on the Jacks Fork River and moved to Montana over a decade ago to chase the powder and carve into slopes. Fishing had been his only artform – he’d skip high school classes to cast a line.

“Après is the best gig in the whole world. Everyone’s coming off the hill, they’re feeling good,” musician Brian Stumpf said of his regular Sunday gig at Scissorbills Saloon. PHOTO BY JANA BOUNDS

Making it on music

It’s easy to recognize that Brian Stumpf hit local celebrity status ages ago. He handed out more high-fives in a 10-minute timeframe before his recent après ski gig at Scissorbills Saloon than most people get to in a year. He’s nonchalant when called out on it.

Big Sky photographer Mike Haring fits right in with this shot of bighorn sheep.

The art of his adventure

Mike Haring stuffed $600 in his pocket and bought a one-way ticket to Europe when he was 21 years old. He stayed for 13 months – surviving by playing music on the streets.

“This was 1985,” he explained. “There were no cell phones; no credit cards.”

James Clark sketches in preparation for his art show in his place of employment as a tattoo artist, Clendenin Customs Tattoo & Gallery. PHOTO BY JANA BOUNDS

Take a walk

Local artist James Clark intends to traverse the United States not by plane, train, automobile, horse or bicycle. He's traveling via his own two feet – and considers every step a movement toward healing.

Notice these yet?

Pop goes the easel

The mysterious white flags showed up on the Thursday before the Mountain Film Festival came to town. Fluttering in the wind, the simple works of Big Sky-style public art have slowly been catching folks’ eyes as they look east from the Town Center toward the Hummocks and Uplands trails.

Ryan Wingfield, an Alaskan comic by way of Boise, made his way through snowy weather to Big Sky last winter to do a set at Lone Peak Brewery and Taphouse.

Remotely funny

Steve Nordahl, owner of Lone Peak Brewing and Taphouse, started bringing in comedy shows two and a half years ago. He described the inception as a bit of a selfish desire; he likes going to comedy clubs on vacations, and wanted to bring that type of entertainment to Big Sky. 

Pages

Comment Here
Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 209715200 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 104 bytes) in /home/lonepeak/www/www/includes/database/database.inc on line 751