Art

When asked, "What should we expect to hear or what should we be listening for?" Blackbird responded with one word: "Nothing." They said they wanted us to come in with an open mind and no expectations, like a child being exposed to something new – suddenly getting wide-eyed about experiencing something exciting for the first time.

The Fabview

There are two types of art that I love and appreciate the most: art that is fun and easy to enjoy, and art that really engages my mind and makes me think. The other night, Eighth Blackbird brought both of those together for me. The music was enjoyable to listen to and also made me wonder: What is music, and what is art?

Kira Fercho describes her work as a combination of Imposto, Russian Impressionism as well as Western Tonalism.

A calling to create

Billings native Kira Fercho either loves or hates things. There is no in-between. Exercising self-control, she makes one New Year’s resolution per year to do something she hates. One year that was to endlessly listen to Mariah Carey’s music. “And now I love it,” she said.

All but the glue and the nails have been harvested from nature for Brett Ozment’s creations.

Art on the fly

It is clear that to Brett Ozment art is freedom and freedom is art. He left the familiarity of his Missouri home with long nights spent fishing on the Jacks Fork River and moved to Montana over a decade ago to chase the powder and carve into slopes. Fishing had been his only artform – he’d skip high school classes to cast a line.

“Après is the best gig in the whole world. Everyone’s coming off the hill, they’re feeling good,” musician Brian Stumpf said of his regular Sunday gig at Scissorbills Saloon. PHOTO BY JANA BOUNDS

Making it on music

It’s easy to recognize that Brian Stumpf hit local celebrity status ages ago. He handed out more high-fives in a 10-minute timeframe before his recent après ski gig at Scissorbills Saloon than most people get to in a year. He’s nonchalant when called out on it.

Big Sky photographer Mike Haring fits right in with this shot of bighorn sheep.

The art of his adventure

Mike Haring stuffed $600 in his pocket and bought a one-way ticket to Europe when he was 21 years old. He stayed for 13 months – surviving by playing music on the streets.

“This was 1985,” he explained. “There were no cell phones; no credit cards.”

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