Big Sky

Honey, I’m home! This young bear found its way into a Big Sky vacation rental home through a window screen recently. While it’s typically OK to leave a window open while you’re home, it’s advised to shut and lock them when you’re away so these curious animals don’t have the opportunity to easily get inside.

Bad year for bears

Breaking and entering. Damaging rental vehicles. Stealing food. Digging in trash. Distracting drivers. The rap sheet is a mile long. 

     The offenders in question: black bears.

Hailing from Seattle, the Polyrhythmics arrive in Big Sky following a show in Carnation, Wash. and then on to Victor, Idaho.

Band of plenty

Lone Peak Lookout: Getting an eight-piece band together must be quite the task. Could you describe how Polyrhythmics came to be? And why the band works so well together? 

While the allocation meeting proceeded inside, just across the highway a herd of cow elk and their calves struggled to negotiate the Gallatin River. Then as the meeting let out, some who attended drove over to watch as cow elk braved the water to be reunited with their young.

From tourist wallets

It’s the closest thing Big Sky has to a city council budget meeting—the annual resort tax allocation, held on June 18 at the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center. Jamey Kabisch, chair of the resort tax board, kicked things off, saying, “Let’s go through the funds available.”

Moonlight Territories I, II and III stand at center of Lone Mountain Land Company’s ongoing effort to win approval for Moonlight’s 10-year Overall Development Plan.

Wildlife in Moonlight

The Wildlife Conservation Society praised Lone Mountain Land Company as “a unique conservation developer.” The Greater Yellowstone Coalition also gave a nod to LMLC’s efforts and sensitivity toward wildlife.

BEST OF THE BLOTTER

A deputy went to Firelight Meadows to investigate a possible domestic dispute at a unit there. It was determined the reporting party had overheard a scene from a TV show where a woman was assaulted by a man. It also was determined no domestic violence occurred in real life.

June 19, 2018

Like lingering Christmas decorations still out in March, local “Help Wanted” signs seem to hang around for an uncomfortably long period of time. Find this one at QuickPrint on Snowy Mountain Circle.

Hiring crunch

On a busy morning in early June at the Big Sky Conoco, owners Renae and Steve Schumacher worked the store’s two registers as a steady stream of customers lined up to purchase items they need to start their day.

If the residents who signed the abandonment petition have their way, a gate would be installed at this location and the roads behind would be closed to the public.

Another gate?

A petition to abandon portions of Streamside Way and Great Horn Road made its way to the Gallatin County Commission in late March and a viewing committee comprised of Gallatin County Commissioner Don Seifert and Charlotte Mills with the county clerk and recorder’s office came to Big Sky recently to take a look at the roads.

Sergeant Brandon Kelly (center)—who patrols the Gallatin Canyon for the sheriff’s office—looks down at a ball cap later taken into evidence. Kelly is flanked by Montana Highway Patrol Sergeant Patrick McCarthy (left) and Gallatin County Sheriff's Deputy Douglas W. Lieurance.

Road to nowhere

Show Place in Belgrade is a dead-end court lined with small apartment buildings and filled with cars. For someone on drugs who allegedly stole a vehicle in Billings and started to run out of gas in Belgrade, this quiet residential street looked like it held opportunity. 

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