News

Bustling in Big Sky 

While many companies are inclined to shut down for the holidays due to paying a premium for workers: from time-and-a-half to double-time or overtime wages, according to a study by the Society of Human Resource Management, Big Sky and resort communities in general operate differently.

A walking miracle: 16-year-old Gus Hoffman survived a horrific accident a year and a half ago, but has never stopped pursuing his dream of becoming a horse trainer.

Riding on resilience

Gus Hoffman believes it was a grizzly which spooked his horse, Soldier, after he dismounted for trail cleanup in June of 2017. He was alone, the lead rope in one hand and a saw in the other, when the 15-hand horse’s powerful rear hoof launched to his throat. Gus fell back, dropped the rope and felt disoriented – like he couldn’t breathe.

Tourists ignore signs warning of danger this past summer and descend from the boardwalk at Lower Geyser Basin to submerge their hands in the thermal water.

A hard-earned winter

Yellowstone National Park rests beneath a blanket – much earned respite from the nearly 4.2 million visits it now typically accommodates. If the trend holds from 2012-17, visits will crawl to just about 20,000 this winter - a sharp decline from the almost 2.5 million occurring June, July and August, on average.

National Guard Infantryman Eric Petz to presents the Patriot Award to his employer John Delzer. John’s wife, Toni, stands by with a proud smile.

A flight for patriotism

John and Toni Delzer, owners of Delzer Diversified, a long-standing Big Sky snow and ice maintenance company, will soon get to fly in a Chinook or Blackhawk helicopter – a surprise which led to many high fives and mile-wide grins.

Baby, it’s cold outside

The human body is a remarkable machine which alters depending on surroundings. We started asking questions at a recent staff meeting in anticipation of a cold snap: How do locals fair so much better playing in the cold than people from warmer climates? Why do visitors from flatter areas struggle so much with elevation?

Streamside Way winds up to Great Horn Road and Greathorn Ranch. Roads leading to the relatively remote neighborhood were requested by residents of the area to be abandoned, effectively making the roads private. That request was shot down by Gallatin County commissioners in late November.

Road abandon 'No'

Headed south towards Firelight Meadows on Ousel Falls Road it’s easy to overlook Streamside Way, an unassuming road that leads up to a mountainous residential development known as Greathorn Ranch. Likely, not many passersby opt to turn left and head up the hill.

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Lone Peak Lookout

Cori Koenig, editor: editor@lonepeaklookout.com
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