News

Signs of maturity?

A round up of current indicators show Big Sky is a maturing ski destination experiencing growth with more on the horizon—including additional hotels—and other amenities designed to attract and satisfy visitors. 

Big Sky School District Superintendent Dustin Shipman takes a look at his students’ ACT results, pleased to say 12 out of the 17 had a score of 22 or above, making them eligible for Montana University System admission. “We can say that 12 out of 17 of our students, when they were juniors, were prepared for college… I’m pretty proud of that,” he said.

High marks

The results are in, and for the second year in a row, Lone Peak High School came in first for ACT scores in the state of Montana, with 17 test takers averaging a 23.18. In 2015-16 LPHS came in third.

BIG HORN OF THE WEEK

Kole has started the year with an outstanding work ethic and a commitment to doing well. He shows maturity in the classroom when he works with peers and upholds his end of the responsibilities. Kole is also a student who goes above and beyond when asked to help out.

Notice these yet?

Pop goes the easel

The mysterious white flags showed up on the Thursday before the Mountain Film Festival came to town. Fluttering in the wind, the simple works of Big Sky-style public art have slowly been catching folks’ eyes as they look east from the Town Center toward the Hummocks and Uplands trails.

Group hikes are a highlight of Lone Peak High School’s back to school Expedition. This year the Freshman class climbed their way up to Garnet Cabin, a former Forest Service fire lookout with views of the Gallatin Canyon, including Lava Lake. Left to right: Carly Wilson, Samantha Suazo, Luke Kitchmayr, John Chadwell, Nate McClain.

Notes from the board

New faculty introductions were in order before getting down to business at the Big Sky School District Board of Directors regular meeting on the afternoon of Sept. 11. The new faces hailed from Connecticut, Miami, Las Vegas and beyond.

Pick your passion

You can discover a lot about the person by learning what charitable organizations they support. That’s what Big Sky Build, Inc. owner John Seelye learned when he decided this year to enable one employee a month to donate $200 to a charity of their choice.

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