not so average jane

PHOTO COURTESY ANNA JOHNSON

Grow roots where you’re planted

Roseburg, Ore. lies along the edge of the rugged Umpqua River in a lush, green and muddy valley. Known historically as the “Timber Capital of the World” and now for outdoor recreation, the town of 30,000 people is where Anna Johnson grew up. The Johnson family, especially Anna’s mom, raised her in the tradition of independence.

Samantha Mize-Honatke with her three-year-old son Trey who “gets into everything” to the point that she and her husband have nicknamed him “Trey-nado”. PHOTO COURTESY SAMANTHA MIZE-HONATKE

Life by the numbers

Samantha Mize-Honatke once dipped her toe in water outside of Montana. She tried Phoenix for a year, “but the water was too hot,” she joked. Sure, she missed the Montana mountains and seasons and had a palpable distaste for all the concrete in the city, but people were what really made her pack up and head back to her Gallatin Gateway roots.

Evi Dixon with one of her alpacas. She learned to shear the animals after getting them initially to take care of the grass on her property. PHOTO COURTESY EVI DIXON

The art of the segue

It was negative three degrees outside when Evi Dixon remarked on what a beautiful day it was. Originally from Austria, she is no stranger to a white world and chilly temperatures. Actually, snow is what initially brought her to Big Sky – the plan was to work one season abroad as a ski instructor.

“I really love the commonality of what really draws people to Big Sky. There are very few of us that seem to buy into the 8-5 Monday through Friday rat race. The quality of life you can live here, you can spend most of it outdoors,” Becky Brockie said.

Learning along the way

Becky Brockie has shot many weddings in her time as a photographer in the area, but people may not have noticed her. Her goal was always to not be noticed – to function as an observer, the camera serving as a buffer between her shyness and the rest of the world. She describes herself as a very good wallflower.
 

Ciara Wolfe earned her driver’s license the same day she piloted her first solo flight. PHOTO COURTESY CIARA WOLFE

On the horizon

Ciara Wolfe is not shy in board meetings, in her career, or in life. She has never allowed herself that luxury. The way she sees it, everyone has a responsibility to live up to their full potential. People have an obligation to use their talents to better the world, to better themselves and to fully live.

Candice Brownmiller’s Appalachian Trail name was “Montana”. PHOTO COURTESY CANDICE BROWNMILLER

A path forward in remembrance

Over 2,000 miles in a little over five months, placing one foot in front of the other through every kind of terrain and enduring whatever Mother Nature threw at her. With every step north on the Appalachian Trail (AT), Candice Brownmiller found renewed faith in humanity.

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Lone Peak Lookout

Cori Koenig, editor: editor@lonepeaklookout.com
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